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. >> al qaeda benefits from yemen. the ethnicity of many of its members are of arabic heritage. osama bin laden -- it is close to saudi arabia, there are funding sources from private citizens. >> yemen is on high alert. security has been tightened. multiple checkpoints have been set up and tanks are guarding key installations. the yemeni army has surrounded foreign buildings as well as the airport. the strategic interest to the red sea is also being closely monitored. as muslims celebrate the end of the month of ramen on -- ramadan, the yemeni government says they have foiled a plot by al qaeda. >> the interior ministry has implemented many security plans for safety and stability in yemen. to protect our citizens and the foreigners living here. the united states says it will remain cautious and keep 19 of the 22 diplomatic post closed at least until the end of the week. >> the use of drones is one way the u.s. military has approached unmanned combat. >> they look like something from a science-fiction movie movie, but they are very real. some fear these robots could become the drones of th
:00 a.m. that the takedown of osama bin laden occurred. someone with my left had a lot to do with that. more on that later. a special welcome to the ambassador of
the killing of osama bin laden,ut have things improved marginally in the past few months? >> it is difficult to know exactly. we can say with confidence that the two services work together quite regularly and interact regularly. if things have gotten better or worse, it is difficult to know. we have seen fewer drone strikes recently in pakistan. >> that was something john kerry was keen to stress when he visited. >> the point is that they are saying, we are trying to take the pakistanis concerns. they are trying to use this tool in a more irregular fashion, if you will come and try to use other ways and open the line of communication. the americans realize this is an important relationship, both in terms with pakistan, and what happens with pakistan -- afghanistan and 2014. with aowards 2014 fraught relationship with pakistan is in nobody's interest. >> when you are looking at the intelligence gathering, this seems to ask him -- this seems to have come from some sort of chapter, it mexico fund -- difficult for any mission or foreign national living and working in pakistan. it hasa very long
and communication security of osama bin laden is, he would not be online in direct communication. he shows up at various points. there is a suggestion that he was indeed in the conversation. people have asked us, why would you report all these details? our sources have made it clear that when the leader who reported the communications -- it was enough information for al qaeda to walk back the cat. we left out some details from our initial report. believe,oint, we especially since our sources were giving us this information, that it was important to explain the current context of threats. point, i think it is a tough one. cannot argue with the fact that u.s. special operations forces in 2011 found osama bin laden and killed him. that was a huge blow to the organization. that, years leading up to a lot of analysts believe that bin laden was out of touch. they figured he did not play a day-to-day role. the organization has devolved into affiliates. one of the stories i remember writing after the raid -- bin laden played an important role in terms of managing this organization with these various
. these are armed attacks with r.p.g.'s, et cetera. it does make you wonder the kill of osama bin laden, a profound moral victory, didn't end the effectiveness of al qaeda. this is being manned by al zawahari who is at large. maybe we didn't end al qaeda by going -- >>steve: maybe we busted into the centralized al qaeda h.q. now it's fragmented all over. some are wondering whether or not you look at what happened in benghazi, where they killed four brave americans, clearly some sort of al qaeda-linked terror attack, and who's been held accountable. nobody. even though we knew, "the new york times" talked to some of the suspects and others have since then, we haven't done anything. now some are wondering is this a gross overreaction to some intel? susan rice, who is currently running the n.s.a., reportedly sees similarities trying to make sure this is not a repeat of what happened last year. here's lindsay graham and bill crystal. >> they are taking the right approach to this. benghazi was a complete failure. the threats were real there, reporting was real and we dropped the ball. we've learned from
to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [ cheers ] >> because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. >> over overnight in yemen which is on high alert the u.s. conducted its sixth punishing drone strike in ten days. the yemeni government said six suspected al qaeda members were killed. 29 suspected al qaeda terrorists have been taken out by u.s. drones in the past ten days. new throats from al qaeda forced the evacuation of the u.s. embassy in yemen. among those outposts shut down through at least saturday by terror concerns. i wagood morning. >> good morning. >> the president says al qaeda has been hammered. he said they are on their way to defeat. from a messaging standpoint, how tricky is it to send that reassuring message at the same time you are evacuating americans? >> i think they are te directly linked. there is clear intelligence that the administration has received that these embassies are being targeted overseas. there is a clear oh effort by the administration to use the drone strikes against what they see as a
is in afghanistan, alongside osama bin laden and kaurted and went back to prison and escaped from prison. >> what is going on with these prison breaks? >> it's scary. >> this was while ago but we had someone the last couple of weeks as well. >> the last couple of weeks very dramatic prison breaks. over a thousand taliban prisoners were able to escape in the hinterlands. a couple of days ago 4,000 prisoners walked out of leppo prisoner after islamic state of iraq launched an attack on that prison. we have seen prison breaks in iraq and abu ghraib and elsewhere. some of them gotten out we never will see again but unfortunately we will see some again and we will find out they are as dedicated what they were sent there to begin with. >> general, what do we need to do? what is the strategy moving forward? because when it comes to the middle east, obviously, we are getting out of iraq and afghanistan. we are helping some of the rebels some syria. seems like we are relying on drones to go after so many targets now. what is the strategy moving forward? >> i think we have probably done about as well as we
on terror continues whether osama bin wanted is dead does not mean alaeda is dead be cleared out 20 embassies around the world to move this tax out by the way we cannot say evacuate. it was the ordey departure th know what is going on and they are getting troubled by the fact that the lexicon has reached every part of the administration whether iras iras, defense department, war on terror, they will call it their own dictionary sll believe we should move the white house to california since we hear national security on jay leno give me a break hcannot talk to the press corps but he ss down with jay leno? lou: that the term radical islamist should not be used or the war on terror or the overseas contingency operation. thlist goes on and on and to talk with jay leno i am sure you both notice he did as a radical islamist but violent radical extremist and vient extremist and did not even refer to a terrorist or radical is law because frankly this administration does not have the intellectuals or individual courage to speak graham -- played the to the american people to t enemies are and
interview of osama bin laden back in 1997. gregory johnsen is the author of the last refuge, yemen, al qaeda and america's war in arabia. welcome. peter, what triggered all of this as far as we understand it is the head of al qaeda sent a message to al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, in yemen, asking them, you know, do some terrorism, please. >> yeah, do something. >> now, is that a sign of weakness or strength? >> it's a sign of just sending a message. i mean it's do something is pretty -- it's not like, you know, the end of the world is coming. and so far whatever that something is hasn't transpired. and i think that al qaeda central is aware of its own problems and even al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is not doing particularly well, despite all of the flurry of things we've seen over the past week. about 30 of their leaders and south operatives have been killed in cia drone strikes, so their bench is thinning. >> why has yemen become the next place, after afghanistan, pakistan? >> right. well, i think in yemen you have a very weak central government so this is a government that doesn't
made that announcement on al qaedas' web site. he was reported by an aid to osama bin laden and became the ahead of an affiliate after he tunnelinged out of a prison in yemen. the terror leader did not say how he would free those imprisoned members but al qaeda has claimed responsibility for simultaneous raids on two iraq prisons, reportedly setting free more than 500 inmates. his us replacement were also part hoff the intelligence that caused the u.s. to close 19 embassies last week, but the one in yemen re-opened yet. -young -- robert young understands the situation. >> civil war started in the mid-'90s in the northern and southern part broke away and battled way. we're getting involved in a tribal conflict, much like you see in pakistan, under the guise of fighting terrorism. so of the 600 people we killed, just with drones. only 50 of those would we classified as terrorist. so there's a lot of killing going on in the air and on the ground. >> shepard: explain more how this works and what the end game is. >> well, right now, we're faced with a core group of people from saudi arabia
it osama bin laden, and that did not get him in 11 months. so we have informed, i think, the public that there is a steal the environment. it is for reason, we are intent on capturing those who carried out this attack, and we're going to stay on until we get them. i will leave it at that. but this remains a top priority for us. anybody who attacks americans and kills tragically for americans who are serving as an a very dangerous place, we will do everything we can to get this to carry up as a tax. with respect to health care, did not simply choose to the latest on my own. this was not in consultation with businesses all across the country. many of whom are supportive of the affordable care act and many have come, by the way, are already providing health insurance of their employees but were concerned about the operational details of changing their operations if they have a lot of employees was to be costly for them and then suggesting maybe easier ways to do this. now, what is true is that in a normal political environment it would have been easier for me to simply call -- call of
the c.i.a. find osama bin laden. he worked for u.s. intelligence collecting d.n.a. to verify bin laden's presence. he was sentenced to prison in may of 2012. >> india has arrested its most wanted criminal, held on wednesday on the eastern border with nepal. the group has been linked to a group claiming responsibility for attacks in india. we are joined live from new delhi with more on that story. what can you tell us about the arrest? >> he was arrested on the indian-nipal border. it was a secret operation, he was arrested along with three other people. what we should say, though is it's unclear where the process goes from here or which stage it is at following his arrest. it will be watched with extreme interest across the country and region particularly for a country that certainly wanted a glimpse into the indian mujahedeen for sometime. >> all right. thanks very much for joining us out of new delhi. >> employee's teams in china are struggling with surging water levels after 33,000 people she cram waited. the military have been along the river. we have more. >> i know everyone's tir
aggressive when you look on the policy of drones, going in and getting osama bin laden, something the bush administration failed to do. and he's alsoing more cautious. if you look at the way we dealt with libya and egypt, sort of backing off and sort of supporting what we saw as the goals of the arab street without putting boots on the ground, so this president who was famously cautious about iraq is now in an awkward position. the things we were told about saddam hussein are actually true in libya, and we have this caution. >> we are talking about the republicans in their her to the president, a lot of people were questioning where they were yesterday at the march on washington, the celebration. we have dr. martin luther king's speech yesterday, but i want to show -- i'm sorry. we don't have that sound, but what i do have is the information that john boehner and eric cantor were invited to be there, and they decided not to be there. mlk was a registered republican, wasn't he? >> according to one family member. >> his father was. >> his father was. >> why would republicans take a distant a
ordered the retrial of a doctor who helped the cia find osama bin laden. he had worked for u.s. intelligence by collecting dna to verify bin laden's presence. he was sentenced to 33 years in prison on may 2012 for being a member of a militant group. both he and the group deny this. >>> one of the most wanted men in india has been arrested. he's the alleged founder of the indian mujahadeen and has been accused of a series of bombing. >> reporter: indian authorities have been searching for him in connection with a string of terrorist attacks in india between 2008 and 2013. they allege he orchestrated this attack in mumbai in 2011. three simultaneous bomb blasts rocked the country's financial capital during evening rush hour, killing at least 18 people and injuring 131 others. the arrest comes just weeks after another man the government alleges to be a key figure of the militant group was captured in the same area. the director general of the police force says these arrests are significant. >> so far with the infiltration of the minds of people running it, and getting them has b
about the intelligence community tracking of osama bin laden. the raid it says was guided by a group of satellites in space which pointed dozens of separate receivers of pakistan to collect a vast amount of data as the mission took place. it noticed the united states watches allies and enemies. counter intelligence operations are strategically focused against targets of china, russia, iran, cuba and israel. >> i don't think that would surprise anybody who we are collecting against and also what we think our major concerns are in the world. it makes sense to have that in the budget. it would be better for it nout to be out in the public domain. >> reporter: north korea says what are described as five critical gaps in u.s. intelligence about nuclear and missile programs and analysts knowing almost nothing about the intentions of new leader, kim jong-un. interesting that it was revealed in a story leaked by former contract employee, snowden, one of their own. >> much more on this with the panel. >>> a disturbing look at the fort hood shooter before his attack. >>> here is what our fox a
in "the washington post" offering more detail about the raid that killed osama bin laden, it says forensic intelligence agents working in afghanistan confirmed his identity eight hours after he was killed using dna from his corpse. "the post" information is based on data from leaker edward snowden. >>> friday marks san diego mayor bob filner's final day in office at 5:00, city council president todd gloria will take over as interim mayor and a special election is set for november 19th. gloria allred is celebrating his last day, she represents several women harassed by filner. >>> new york is a great place but it took a couple of kittens to shut down the subway, service came to a halt thursday for 90 minutes as they looked for the fugitive fee lines, the rail could be deadly to an unsuspecting cat. at first there was no luck finding the kittens but they were found hours later and taken to a local animal shelter. it would really anger commuters, but come on, look at that face. >> got to save the kittens. good stuff. >> and they did. that's some good news. we'll take a break here on "new day.
. so when you kill a leader, harris, like osama bin laden, the movement goes on. >> you echo each other a little bit. but you say you go a step further, the enemy is building, will not be deterred. what's happening. >> true, harris. actually, the general is right, it is about an ideology, no doubt. and one more point, the administration unfortunately and its advisers have refused to engage this ideology, to confront this ideology. from memos the past few years, says there is no ideology. if you actually don't recognize it exists, it will continue to exist and recruit more people. as important also are the forces that we should have allied ourselves with against the jihadists. look what's happening in egypt and tunesia and libya. who is demonstrating on the streets against the islamists and their allies and the jihadists? the youth, women, minorities. we didn't have a strategy to ally with them the last ten years. by now, we have anti-jihadist and anti-forces. >> part of the ideology, is it religious, one group against the world? >> it is perceived by the jihadists that they are the ones
between the man who succeeded osama bin laden as the head of al qaeda central and a former personal aide to bin laden and who is also the head of al qaeda's satellite group al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. nbc news reports tonight that a third significant al qaeda operative was also a party to communication discussing the attack. that third al qaeda leader expressed the desire to blow himself up in an attack, something he has not been allowed to do in the past. today a state department spokesperson was asked about the striking coincidence that the government made the threat public immediately after russia granted asylum to edward snowden, the nsa leaker. >> couldn't it be argued that suddenly we're hearing about this potential threat to u.s. interests and u.s. persons and property at a time when there's a lot of debate and a lot of criticism of this program as well as other nsa types of surveillance? >> i can assure you that that in no way at all, period, 100% affects how we evaluate threat information coming in, specifically in terms of this threat. >> republican peter king offered a
that jihadists have used to their advantage. yemen, the ancestral home of osama bin laden has become the base of al qaeda. eight years later the terrorist organization targeted the u.s. embassy in the yemeni capitol killing one american. in 2011 robert worth wrote an article in "the new york times." it was titled "yemen on the brink of hell." yemen is a source of leverage for weakened regimes. quote, terrorism helps raise the profile of a country that had long been neglected. as one yemeni official put it to me, yemen used to be called the tail of the saudi cow. now it is its own cow. former president alley abdullah saleh seemed to view al qaeda as a bargaining chip. he paroled convicted terrorists or allowed them to escape from prison, even as he cracked down on the peaceful protestors. i have two analysts joining me. in terms of being a partner, if you will, on the war on terror, can the yemeni redress it? as you pointed out, having al qaeda in their backyard has almost been a point of leverage with the west and we see what the sewing of those seas have brought in yemen today. >> that's tru
is never going to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [ cheers ] >> because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. >> over overnight in yemen which is on high alert the u.s. conducted its sixth punishing drone strike in ten days. the yemeni government said six suspected al qaeda members were killed. 29 suspected al qaeda terrorists have been taken out by u.s. drones in the past ten days. new throats from al qaeda forced the evacuation of the u.s. embassy in yemen. among those outposts shut down through at least saturday by terror concerns. i wan
. the second part tells the story of two men from yemen including one who was a driver for osama bin laden. miss potress is still working on the third installment in that trilogy which is about u.s. surveillance of phone calls and e-mails and so on since 9/11. she posted a bit of that one last year on "the new york times" website. >> build social networks for everybody. that turns into the graph then you index all that data to that graph which means you can pull out a community, that that gives you an outline of the life of everybody in the community. and if you carry it over time from 2001 up, you have that ten years worth of their life that you can lay out in a timeline that involves anybody in the country. even senators and house of representatives. all of them. the dangers here are that we fall into something like a totalitarian state like east germany. >> working with top-level sources like that former nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing her films all over the world, laura poitress, the documentarian, she has been busy. she's been doing traveling for he
libya, and putting the special forces into pakistan to get to osama bin laden, those were cases where the president wanted to be careful and get to a specific end game. here, i think we're not looking for an open-ended military conflict. but the military strategy is probably on the president's desk. that the joint chiefs are probably looking at right now. i've been in some of the rooms where the military options have been discussed. the number one reason, to degrade his capabilities, to deter him from doing this again. we have lost some of it, it is to hold at risk something that assad values. so if we can put in our sight those things we values, the military command in control, the military headquarters, the rocket-firing capabilities, and some of his air offensive, that can be accomplished. >> can that be accomplished with military strikes? >> it can be accomplished, we just put on station a fifth guided missile destroyer, the uss stout came to the eastern area today. we'll have enough fire power, while we would love to have allies like the brits, we don't need them for fire power,
zinni, you oversaw bill clinton's attempt to kill osama bin laden in 2008 and you warned against president bush's mistakes in iraq. do you believe that president obama is on the verge of making a mistake in syria? >> i think, you know, he's made the commitment and he's put down the red line, and i think it's inevitable now that he has to follow through. if -- to not follow through would embolden assad and tell him he could use chemical weapons. i would make one point, which is really critical here, this is not about supporting the united states or a united states move. this is about the chemical weapons convention. 191 countries signed on to this, including the british and others, and i think that the administration should have made a better case that this is sort of separate from involvement in long-term in this civil war. it's about enforcement of something that 191 countries signed on and only five countries have refused to do it. >> well, i think the president has tried to make that -- we'll get back to that in a moment. let me ask colonel leighton, the white house released i
of building seven. now that osama bin laden is dead and 911 is a decade behind us and more, i think a good argument can be made that the documents that the federal government has regarding the 911 attacks should be declassified and the truth will come out. host: you have to distinguish between those two things. bradley manning did leave an awful lot of classified information. evidently, it went to wikileaks and i think the court was correct in deciding it was not guilty of aiding the enemy because he had not directed that information to the enemy and that is what the statute says. that is how military justice rules agreed. with regard to the rest of it, i think it is clear that he did, in fact, leaked confidential information that was classified and therefore, he got punished. many people do great things sometimes get punished for them. i think back to the civil-rights era and help congressman john lewis was punished over and over again for acts of courage. this countryrs because the security system, the intelligence community and the military defense complex, military-industrial complex h
relations point for a osama bin on in the most famous terrorist of our age went so far to say that the media war is $0.94 of waging jihad the emphasis was not on the battlefield but on the perception he could foster among his enemies. the very fact media and public opinion has become so incredibly important put a great power the united states the specially a great democratic power at a disadvantage. said you look at what has changed and as part of the book we did a day debate -- a database that is included as the appendix and what we found the with rate has gone up prior to 1945 the insurgents when about 20 percent of the war's been since 1945 they went about 40% so that rate is roughly doubled. what accounts for that? i say the power of public opinion in the ability of relatively weak groups to bring down strother adversaries so that is something they try to do sometimes successfully. but there is a danger we should not swing too far and should not underestimate the power of guerrillas or overestimate them either they're not invincible. there is a tendency in the post-world war two era to f
liberties they nor match for government. this is osama bin laden's wildest dream, that the american people would do this to themselves. >> dianne feinstein claimed the nsa has prevented attacks. there's been no evidence that's the case, and tsa claims it stopped plots but there's been no evidence. and the one thing we do know historically is that the few would-be bombers and hijackers that have been stopped, have been stopped by fellow passengers. we can protect ourselves and we need to remember we have more power than we ever give ourselves credit for, and utilize it and we'll be far safer under that basis. so, one over there in then -- you can -- >> i'm particularly conflicted on this matter because i usually like to evaluate both sides of an issue and when i attend events like this, i usually hear one side of it, and i would really like to hear you poke holes in the other side and i'd like to use this opportunity ask you a very specific question. ... >> it would not be good security. if you tipoff the bad guys you won't find in that same way again. the hypothetical is -- >> at think you
telling the post, there are owned by an arab country and ran the osama bin laden tapes. i would not trust them. cable channels rely on advertisers for upwards of half of their total revenue. the other half coming from monthly fees. so far al jazeera america getting a backlash. ashley: it is interesting whether they can get a foothold are not, dennis. >> those who are looking for a different slant on the news, sure. the question is, how large is -- largest that audience. ashley: they have plenty of money. they will worry about sponsors. >> getting less and less all the time with the oil production. ashley: thank you very much. good point. tracy: a quarter past the hour. time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes. that's it right down to the floor of the new york stock exchange. we have had back-and-forth action and a lot going forward this week. what are you thinking? >> and thinking i can't wait for this week to be overt. >> you can't think that. think something else. >> everyone is going to look forward to the fed minutes, probably the most important item to try and get a handle on exactl
they are no match for government. this is osama bin laden's wildest dreams that the american people would do this to themselves. >> dianne feinstein claimed that the nsa prevented a tax but no evidence fits the case and tea s.a. claims it stopped plots but there has been no evidence and one thing we do know historically is some would-be bombers and hijackers stopped by their fellow passengers -- who can protect ourselves and we need to remember we have more power than we ever give ourselves credit for and utilize them and we will be far safer under that basis. there is one over there and that's come over here. >> i am particularly conflict on this matter because i like to evaluate both sides of an issue and when i attend events like this, i usually hear one side of it and i would really like to hear you polk holes in the other side. i would like to use this opportunity to ask you a very specific question. what you just mentioned about we don't know how many acts of terrorism have been avoided and conclude none of them have been avoided, part of the security methodology is you find evidence a
us on 9/11, and now al qaeda is on the run, and osama bin laden is dead. >> i think it is indisputable that the elimination of osama bin laden was a major a couple smith in the effort against al qaeda. clearesident has been that the threat from all kind of qaeda very much still looms. , our action that we take extra ordinarily capable women and men in uniform, the actions that they take in order to demonstratesfight, how serious we take the threat. no one should be under any illusion that the threat does not still exist. we have numerous communications about what we need to do continually as a nation to elvesct our cells -- ours i the terrorists who mean us harm. the fact that we continue to do those things means that the threat is still will -- real, so we need to be vigilant. i do not think it is a fair reading of the efforts we make , to saythose terrorists it is not real. he has not made that distinctive. he has said that they are decimated. leadership, the leadership that attacked the united states on september 11, 2001, has been decimated. the al qaeda core has
people would say that president obama the very right to launch azeinab badawi race that killed osama bin laden. history and diplomacy co-exist. they interact with each other and they sometimes can complement each other. richard holbrooke, the late richard holbrooke, great american diplomat, i don't think he would have been able to secure the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian-serb army that we were not going to permit them to continue to kill innocent muslims. and it was that use of force that achieved the cease-fire and drove them to the negotiating table where holbrook worked his magic and brought peace to bosnia after five years of war. so there are times when we have to rely on our military and we're fortunate, as all of you know, to have extraordinary young men and women in our military and the army and the navy and the air force, marines and the coast guard and the national guard. [applause] and, like you, who just applauded, i admire the american military. they are absolutely critical to our security. one of the proudest moments of my
generally worked against al qaeda, osama bin laden being the most prominent example. other members of core al qaeda. and al qaeda-affiliated elements. >> there were three associated forces when you're in office. >> those were the three that i had the occasion to evaluate most often. here were other instances when i would conduct a legal evaluation where we did not go forward with a specific operation, but those are the three most prominent examples that we regularly briefed to congress. you referred to my oxford speech. i think we are at an inflection point as one journalist put it where we should no longer consider ourselves in a traditional armed conflict against al qaeda and affiliated groups. i think benghazi is a prominent example of what i am talking about. you cannot label the benghazi attacked as something conducted by al qaeda and associated forces. it was more of a mixed bag. in this period where we're head in addition new direction, we need to evaluate in congress what new authorities our counterterrorism professionals might need. and we're not just talking about drone strikes.
and supporting terrorism. they killed osama bin laden, but they're with al qaeda in terms of egypt, which is just bizarre. >> reporter: it doesn't really make any sense when you think that the administration acquiesced in the removal of morsi, but on the other hand, the united states doesn't want the egyptian military to absolutely crush dissent because that's a prescription for long civil war that would be very destabilizing and call into question the future ability of egypt to maintain its obligations with israel and everything. >> yep. hotspots all over the place over there. john harwood, thank you. see you later. >> reporter: you bet. >>> we're going to get in a quick break here. when we return, why one insider says forget about larry summers and janet yellen because tim geithner could be the man to follow ben bernanke. >>> first as we head to break, let's check on the national weather forecast with the weather channel's alex wallace. alex. >> good morning to you. it's going to be a hot one across the upper midwest. a lot of areas thought we were done with summer. not the case. extensive heat
what it had to do. you saw president clinton went around all his allies, nato or the u.n., after osama bin laden blew up those east africa embassies in 1998. there's been very limited alliances hitting saddam hussein over various years during the late '90s. there is precedent to this. >> jimmy carter and his carter center in atlanta, peter, they put out a statement earlier today before the secretary of state's comments, before the intelligence assessment release, certainly before the president just spoke at the white house. among other things, the jimmy carter center said this. a punitive military response without a u.n. security councilman date or broad support from nato and the arab league would be illegal under international law and unlikely to alter the course of the war. what do you make of that, peter? >> you know, something can be illegal under international law but still be a le wrgitimate usf force which may seem like a paradox. certainly there is going to be no u.n. resolution. there will not be it looks like a nato kind of collective security article 5 type thing where, you
for the muslim brotherhood organization and he also stated that osama bin laden himself has been a member of the organization and he only left because of logistics issues egarding funding and embarrassment for the king if he is associated with bin laden. there are numerous evidences. we also have evidence the dissertation, written in the 1970's, he stated he was actually writing the theological foundations for al qaeda's organization. he is considered the spiritual leader of the brotherhood. here is numerous evidence, because the possibility of designating the muslim brotherhood as an international terrorist organization should definitely be out there. thank you. >> we love to have your opinions. >> well, this is a large topic area he is not the spiritual guide or leader for the muslim brotherhood. president morsi expressed his hope during a speech that they would be free, because that is a popular sentiment we have seen hroughout egypt. but that is not to dismiss the issue entirely. we should be careful about it. after 9/11, one of the first nanciers by al qaeda was designated by the bus
overreact -- i mean, osama bin laden was caught on tape saying he wanted to bleed america to the point of bankruptcy. and if 250,000 people take ciprol because there are tiny envelopes in washington, d.c., this is our own overreaction. it's self-destructive. >> homeland security and, again, i think the total budget's about $40 billion. if it had not been combined, maybe it would have been 32, 33 billion. so we're not talking about that large amount of money. in the overall picture, it has not been that draining. also you said where are bodies? well, if we hadn't stopped the london explosive plot, if we hadn't stopped the times square, the new york subway bombing, the -- actually, we got lucky in the michigan one, there's three or four thousand people right there, that's just three attacks i'm talking about, and there are any number of others that have been stopped. and again, i just wish the rest of the country used the nypd as the model because there's so much cooperation. if somebody does go to buy certain types of explosives, certain devices, that is told the nypd, and they can foll
in the 1980s in afghanistan when we armed the mujahadeen, now known as al qaeda, osama bin laden and others. that principle that was applied then was the enemy of our enemy is our friend. that's bad foreign policy. we should not be applying that in syria but we should be engaged in every possible way. i mentioned the russians a little while ago and in every possible way to get this under control. yes, hezbollah is tied up in this. the future of israel is tied up in this. we want israel to survive and prosper for everything it stands for but we also want -- >> time, sir. holt: we want a peaceful solution for palestinians in the area. what is going on in syria affects that. >> thank you, sir. madam speaker. oliver: i believe if the united states is to maintain its position as a world power and to dominate as a world power, it is incumbent upon us to pay attention to what is happening in syria. you know, it was very sad that we did not intervene and save more lives in rwanda and i know that there are many people in the international community who know that the united states could have done mor
to do. of you, osama bin laden is no more. because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. core of al qaeda, in afghanistan and pakistan, is on its way to defeat. that happened because of you. because of you, more afghans are reclaiming their immunities, markets, schools, their towns, and they have a chance to forge their own future. areuse of you, more afghans trained and stepping up in defending their own country. and preserving the gains we -- you fought and fled for, we will ensure afghan is never again a source of attack against our country. applause]d that happened because of you. the war in afghanistan will and for you, that means fewer deployments, training time, getting back to what marines do better than anyone else on earth. it means more time here on the homefront with your families, your wives, your husband, your kids. , the end of the war in afghanistan does not mean the end of threats to our nation. as i have said before, he's an -- even as we decimated the al qaeda leadership that attacked us on 9/11, al qaeda affiliates and like-minded extremists still threaten
people would say that president obama had every right to launch the raid that killed osama bin laden. history does demonstrate the forces of diplomacy coexist, they interact with each other and they sometimes and complement each other. richard holbrooke, the late richard holbrooke, great american diplomat, i don't think he would've been able to secure the peace at dayton, the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian army that were not going to commit them to continue to kill innocent muslims but it was a just a force that she'd a cease-fire and drove them to negotiating table were holbrooke worked his magic and brought peace to bosnia after five years of war. so there are times when have to rely on the military and where fortunate as all of you know to have extraordinary young men and women in our military come in the army, the navy and air force, marines and coast guard and the national guard. [applause] wiland like you just applaud, i admire the american military. they are absolutely critical to our security. one of the proudest moments of m
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